2242942665_fbf4ea2825_zIn order to write a good bio, you have to love what you do and be able to describe it in detail.

And in order to communicate what you do, you are going to have to be willing to examine what you have done, so you can come up with the details that describe what you do today.

And some of us, don’t want to do the self-analysis that it takes to come up with the details we need to communicate well.

But if you don’t, your bio is going to sound generic. It’s going to sound just like everyone else in your field, because you  are probably unconsciously imitating what you think your bio should sound like.

Don’t do that. First of all, you are allowed to enjoy what you do.

And if you don’t love what you do, then why not tweak what you do until you love it?

We think that those kinds of changes always have to be 180 degree changes, but sometimes, how you spend your time just needs a little tweak, not a major overhaul.

So if you are afraid to look at what you do closely because you don’t love it, think again. Take a look and see if you can come up with ways to spend more professional time doing the work you love.

Because when you love what you do, we will be able to hear it in your bio and you will become more magnetic.

This concludes my blog series on Building A Better Bio. If you have not already, I sincerely hope you will take my courses Writer Platform Success and Build A Better Bio. The former takes about an hour and the latter takes about thirty minutes. I created these courses because I want your career to take off without you having to spend all your time and money. I am committed to providing comprehensive, affordable video courses for busy people. And I always provide course discounts here in my blog. Please let me know what you think of them by posting a review and thanks for reading!

~ 401 K Plan by M Kasahara

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Party In A JarThis is part six of a seven-part series on bio writing for every level professional.

You have one chance to hook the reader and that’s the first line of your bio.

When you are writing your bio, don’t bury the lead.

Don’t make us wait until the middle of your bio paragraph to tell us precisely what you do.

We need to know what you do right out of the gate. Hit us with reason to keep reading right away.

Whatever you do, don’t keep us in suspense. Don’t imagine that folks are going to keep reading for the big reveal.

So cover the important aspects of who, what, when, where, why, and how you do your work. And use a compelling description of your impact on the world to hook is right in the first line.

Don’t make the reader work. Don’t ask the reader to try and figure out if you can be helpful to them. Hook the reader, and hook the reader good, and then share the rest of the details about what you do.

I always recommend working on the lead of anything you write last. It’s just easy to write the meat first and even the conclusion, and then swing back around and create a catchy hook.

Learn more about bio writing in my latest online video course, Build A Better Bio, which can train you to write the three most important types of bio you will need in an online career in just 30 minutes. Learn more here.

~ Photo by Quabluna

 

 

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At Forage, Good Tippers Make Good LoversJargon ruins your bio’s effectiveness.

In other words, if you write a bio, and no one but insiders in your industry can understand what you are saying, then this is not an effective bio.

Because an effective bio draws people in. And jargon drives folks away.

So if you accidentally put jargon into your bio when drafting, that’s fine. It’s no big deal. Happens to the best of us.

But edit the jargon out by the time you are done rewriting your bio and replace it with everyday language that anyone can understand.

And then your bio will do what it is supposed to do, which is communicate who you are and what you offer to people who do not know you yet.

Folks who are often guilty of this habit seem to be lifestyle coaches, tech industry folks, and spiritual/religious folks. To them I would simply say, do you want to be exclusive in your use of language or inviting?

If you are being exclusive, then you may be screening out folks who might otherwise be interested in you and what you do.

So don’t make your bio into a filter. That’s what jargon does and that’s not the point. Your bio should broadcast you and your strengths to the largest possibly audience, and pull in new leads.

Learn more about bio writing in my latest online video course, Build A Better Bio, which can train you to write the three most important types of bio you will need in an online career in just 30 minutes. Learn more here.

~ Photo by M Kasahara

 

If you are afraid of change, leave it here photo by Katy StoddardSomething must be changed.

The biggest shortcoming I am seeing in the bios that have been submitted so far is they are descriptive. But they describe what folks do without discussing the impact of what they do.

Folks, we don’t merely want to know what you do. We want to know who, what, where, why, and how you have changed the world.

In other words, if your work is not making an impact…then what’s the point of writing this bio?

At the very least, if it’s not going to change the world, then what’s the point?

I’m sure there is or has been a point. But you are neglecting to describe your impact. You are avoiding it.

I am beginning to wonder if you are impactaphobic.

Which makes it seem like you have not made an impact at all…and never will. Which I know is bull honkey.

So I guess my biggest piece of advice right now, when it comes to bio writing, is start by describing your impact. And in order to do this, you must know what your impact is and has been.

Do you think it’s more polite to only tell me what you do without telling me about the impact?

Do you think it’s bragging if you say that your work has actually affected people’s lives.

It isn’t.

More importantly, how would I know if you don’t describe your impact for me?

And I mean in factual terms. Don’t blow me smoke. I’m not asking you to.

So your topic sentence of your bio is: the impact your work has or has had on the world.

Then take the rest of the bio from there and flesh it all out with the who, what, when, where, why, and how of what you offer.

But don’t make me search through your whole bio for your impact.

Because I will search for your impact, if I’m reviewing your bio, but most readers won’t.

~ Photo by Katy Stoddard

Learn more about bio writing in my latest online video course, Build A Better Bio, which can train you to write the three most important types of bio you will need in an online career in just 30 minutes. Learn more here.

Does Your Bio Need A Makeover? Bio Tip Number Three

March 4, 2015

This is part three of a seven-part series on bio writing for every level professional. Now, to answer the question I can anticipate you asking, “How can you write a bio about yourself when there is very little to say?” First, you have to be clear about your direction, what you offer, and whom you […]

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Over At Jane Friedman’s Blog Today With 3 Types of Bios Every Online Professional Needs

March 3, 2015

I wrote a piece for Jane Friedman’s blog today about bio writing for online professionals. After all, writers are not the only pros who need compelling bios, any professional working online today needs engaging bios, as well. And even though the name of my new course is Build A Better Bio, we all actually need […]

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Registration For All My Monthly March Challenges Is Extended Until 9 pm March 2nd

March 1, 2015

Monthly challenges with Christina Katz will commence on Tuesday, March 3rd, rather than Monday March 2nd. There is a bunch of administration required on my end to launch my monthly challenges, depending on how many types of challenges folks sign up for. And this month, folks just happened to sign up for a wide variety […]

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Does Your Bio Need A Makeover? Tip Two Of Seven

March 1, 2015

This is part two of a seven-part series on bio writing for every level professional. One of the most challenging types of bios to write, is the bio for the career you haven’t started yet. This is why, when folks ask, “Should I write the bio for my old career or my new career?” I […]

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Does Your Bio Need A Makeover? Tip One Of Seven

February 27, 2015

This is part one of a seven-part series on bio writing for every level professional. The first tip is this: you need to know what you offer the world in a nutshell, and you need to be able to describe what you offer clearly and concisely in the first few sentences of your bio. Don’t […]

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10 Things That Must Go In Your Bio (Or Your Next Bio Rewrite)

February 25, 2015

Just because you have a bio does not mean that it is communicating the best of what you offer and how what you offer sets you apart from the crowd. Another problem happens when you have not taken the time to really think about these details and how much they matter to those reading your […]

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